Course Syllabus

 

FALL 2016

INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Desiré Whitmore, PhD                   OFFICE:       ATEP D108/ LSB 204

E-MAIL:     dwhitmore@ivc.edu                                   OFFICE PHONE:    949-282-2704

OFFICE HOURS:

  TH       3:00 PM – 4:00 PM, ATEP rm D108

   F      10:00 AM - 11:00 AM, ATEP rm D108

M, W     5:30 PM  – 7:00 PM, IVC    rm LSB 204

MEETING TIMES:

Lecture F 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM ATEP B101A

      Lab F 12:15 PM –   2:50 PM ATEP B102

MATERIALS:

  1. Bound notebook with graph pages for laboratory work (recommended to be correct type from the bookstore).  No other types of lab book will be accepted.  This notebook counts as part of the lab grade. You must enter data from each lab in your lab notebook and have the instructor sign it before you leave.  
  2. EMAIL-- YOU MUST USE YOUR IVC E-MAIL!!    All other email will be ignored. E-mail is the best way to contact me. I check my e-mail from Monday through Friday, and will respond to messages within 48 hours. Make sure to type in an appropriate subject heading, which includes the title of the class (i.e., LET215 – Lab #1 Question). At the end of each message include your FULL name.

ONLINE ACCESS:         This class will be using Canvas.  ivc.instructure.com.

BOOK:        Fundamentals of Light and Lasers, Course 1, Modules 1-3, 1-6, NSF/ UCF, 2014.

                   Elements of Photonics, Course 2, Modules 2-1, 2-2, 2-3, 2-5, CORD/NSF, 2008.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:         This course introduces the fundamental properties of light, including its interaction with and generation from materials. Essential components of optical systems are studied, including lenses, mirrors, prisms, windows, sources, detectors, optoelectronics, polarizers, fibers, and gratings. Students will gain hands-on experience with industrial hardware and tools as they construct basic optical component test setups and systems in the laboratory.

PREREQUISITE:         None,                     RECOMMENDED PREPARATION:                LET 205

QUIZZES:     After each laboratory, we will a 5-10 minute quiz on the previous lecture.

LABORATORY:     Lab notebooks should be used to take notes during lab as well as to record all data taken during experiments. Lab reports are due 1 week after the experiment takes place, and should be uploaded to Canvas.

  • Every lab report submitted needs to have the following title format: LET215_Lab1_Name.pdf

EXAMS:        There will be one semi-cumulative midterm exam and a cumulative final exam. You will have three hours to complete each exam, and you may use only the equations sheets provided with any type of calculator which doesn’t connect to the internet. NO CELL PHONES allowed during the exams. For the first exam, exam revisions may be submitted in order to regain a maximum of 50% of the initially deducted points. On scratch paper, completely redo each part of every problem where points were deducted. Staple these behind the original exam and submit everything seven days after initially receiving back the graded exam.

Process Book: Each student will create a portfolio, due at the end of the course, which contains details on at least 3 of the labs, of which the student is most proud. This book is essentially a portfolio that the student can use during an interview, to demonstrate some of their laboratory skills.

GRADES:

Quizzes             10%

Laboratory         40% (30% reports, 10% notebook)

Exams               40% (20% each)

Process Book    10%

Grading is based on a standard, non-curved scale. A curve will be implemented, if necessary, based on the distribution of grades throughout the course.

Percentage

90-100%

80-89%

70-79%

60-69%

<60%

Grade

A

B

C

D

F

ACADEMIC CODE: The academic code of conduct is in effect. Refer to the IVC Handbook for specific college guidelines. Presentations should be written for a non-technical audience, and should include a discussion of the lab's purpose, the techniques used to acquire data, a comparison of measurements to theoretical expectations, a discussion of required internet research, conclusions, and recommendations for improvement.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

  1. Measure the wavelength and divergence of various laser sources.
  2. Inspect the output of various sources using lasers, broadband sources, and detectors.
  3. Break down and distinguish source spectra into constituent colors via various gas-discharge sources, a grating spectrometer, and photodiode detectors.
  4. Solve the tedious optical alignment task of laser beam spatial filtering.
  5. Differentiate the effects of light diffraction and interference through different apertures.
  6. Evaluate the noise-equivalent power (NEP) of a detector and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of an optical system, using an incandescent source.
  7. Construct a setup to measure the optical radiation pattern of an LED source.
  8. Calculate the spot size of a laser after preparing a setup that uses the Foucault method.
  9. Analyze a laser spot size and transverse mode structure using a beam-profiling camera.

 

TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE

WK

DATES

Course content

EXPERIMENT

1

2

3

4

8/26

9/2

9/9

9/16

Laser Safety

Laser Operation

Energy Bands, Laser Cavities

Laser Beam Parameters A

Diffraction

Spontaneous Emission

Laser Cavity Alignment

Laser Divergence

5

6

7

8

9/23

9/30

10/7

10/14

Laser Beam Parameters B

Laser Datasheet

Laser Types

NO LECTURE →  MIDTERM

Spatial Filtering

Energy Distributions

Laser Alignment II

NO LAB →  MIDTERM

9

10

11

12

10/21

10/28

11/4

11/11

Optical Displays

Optical Fibers I

Optical Fibers II

Detectors

Display Research

Waveguide Coupling

Attenuation through Fibers

Detectors I

13

14

15

16

FIN

11/18

11/25

12/2

12/9

12/16

Detector Noise

NO LECTURE--THANKSGIVING

Cameras

Review

NO LECTURE- FINAL EXAM- 10:30- 12:30 PM

Detector Noise

NO LAB – THANKSGIVING

Camera  Response

Lab catch-up

NO LAB – FINALS WEEK

NOTE: Any part of the above syllabus may be amended at any time during the semester at the discretion of the instructor.

 

Course Summary:

Date Details